Canon Law

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book4 [2017/07/18 16:19]
amycsj [Title II: Liturgy of the Hours]
book4 [2017/07/18 18:28] (current)
amycsj
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 **Canon 1176-1185** - Funerals - more than just burying, but includes the whole ritual - Exequiae. Canon 1240-1243 Cemeteries - governed also by secular law. Three elements of funeral: 1) reception of body after common prayer in house where they died; 2) funus - songs, or mass and/or absutus - absolutions and commendations;​ 3) burial. 1614 all elements canonized including the two processions. Constitution on the Litury 1963 said funerals should have a more resurrection atmosphere. This was confirmed in the 1970 Missale Romanum, which also let in more local custom. 1969 ordo exequiarum - lots of space for episcopal conferences for '​innovation'​. **Canon 1176-1185** - Funerals - more than just burying, but includes the whole ritual - Exequiae. Canon 1240-1243 Cemeteries - governed also by secular law. Three elements of funeral: 1) reception of body after common prayer in house where they died; 2) funus - songs, or mass and/or absutus - absolutions and commendations;​ 3) burial. 1614 all elements canonized including the two processions. Constitution on the Litury 1963 said funerals should have a more resurrection atmosphere. This was confirmed in the 1970 Missale Romanum, which also let in more local custom. 1969 ordo exequiarum - lots of space for episcopal conferences for '​innovation'​.
  
-**Canon 1176.3** Cremation not forbidden. 1000 BCE cremation was the norm; 500 BCE burial became common practice; Romans used cremation for the rich, burial for the poor; With Christianity,​ cremation became marginal (though it existed at the beginning); Burial of Christ, and grain falling to the earth and then rising up; Later burial was associated with resurrection of the body. 500 AD cremation disappeared. Charlemagne - punished cremation capitally. Renaissance and French Revolution gave rise to attempts at cremation; Italian Free Masons first reintroduced it 1869 - doctors also supported it for public health and civilization;​ New techniques made it more acceptable legally in late 1800s; 1886 Holy Office prohibited membership in associations in favor of cremation and no anointing and no church funerals if person wanted cremation; 1917 code maintained the prohibitions;​ 1925 interpretation said church funerals refused to those who asked for cremation, even if not done. The following year they said the revocation had to be proven and ashes couldn'​t be on church grounds and no prayers or ritual. Seen as part of anti-church polemic. There was never a dogma here. 1963 discipline relaxed and anti religious motives fell away. Some negative attitudes are still prohibited. Not against natural or supernatural truths, doesn'​t effect the soul, and doesn'​t prevent the resurrection of the body. But he prohibited religious services at the crematorium. Protestants never condemned it but there is some resistance. Some other documents and finally the 1983 code. All the rituals should take place in the church, before the cremation if possible, if not, omit the committal prayers. No masses and funerals with the urn in the church unless the bishop allows it (CDW). Religious rite is now allowed in crematorium. Urn can be in columbarium (no prayer is provided); spreading the ashes has not christian character. In Belgium 1970 0.3% cremation 1980 5% 1997 30% now close to 60%. 70% catholic ritual.+**Canon 1176.3** Cremation not forbidden. 1000 BCE cremation was the norm; 500 BCE burial became common practice; Romans used cremation for the rich, burial for the poor; With Christianity,​ cremation became marginal (though it existed at the beginning); Burial of Christ, and grain falling to the earth and then rising up; Later burial was associated with resurrection of the body. 500 AD cremation disappeared. Charlemagne - punished cremation capitally. Renaissance and French Revolution gave rise to attempts at cremation; Italian Free Masons first reintroduced it 1869 - doctors also supported it for public health and civilization;​ New techniques made it more acceptable legally in late 1800s; 1886 Holy Office prohibited membership in associations in favor of cremation and no anointing and no church funerals if person wanted cremation; 1917 code maintained the prohibitions;​ 1925 interpretation said church funerals refused to those who asked for cremation, even if not done. The following year they said the revocation had to be proven and ashes couldn'​t be on church grounds and no prayers or ritual. Seen as part of anti-church polemic. There was never a dogma here. 1963 discipline relaxed and anti religious motives fell away. Some negative attitudes are still prohibited. Not against natural or supernatural truths, doesn'​t effect the soul, and doesn'​t prevent the resurrection of the body. But he prohibited religious services at the crematorium. Protestants never condemned it but there is some resistance. Some other documents and finally the 1983 code. All the rituals should take place in the church, before the cremation if possible, if not, omit the committal prayers. No masses and funerals with the urn in the church unless the bishop allows it (CDW). Religious rite is now allowed in crematorium. Urn can be in columbarium (no prayer is provided); spreading the ashes has not christian character. In Belgium 1970 0.3% cremation 1980 5% 1997 30% now close to 60%. 70% catholic ritual. ​[[http://​press.vatican.va/​content/​salastampa/​en/​bollettino/​pubblico/​2016/​10/​25/​161025c.html|Remains]]
  
 ===Chapter I: Celebration=== ===Chapter I: Celebration===
book4.txt ยท Last modified: 2017/07/18 18:28 by amycsj